Formula One in a Good Place after Global Fan Survey

Formula One GDPA Alex Wurz has commented on the recent outpouring of fan feedback regarding the sport, saying that their listening with open ears.

A healthy sport can only sustain itself insofar that it listens to spectator feedback and incorporates it in an effective manner. Formula One – and its various oversight and governing bodies – is committed to doing just that.

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA - MARCH 26: Max Verstappen of the Netherlands driving the (33) Red Bull Racing Red Bull-TAG Heuer RB13 TAG Heuer battles for position with Kimi Raikkonen of Finland driving the (7) Scuderia Ferrari SF70H on track during the Australian Formula One Grand Prix at Albert Park on March 26, 2017 in Melbourne, Australia.  (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)
MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA – MARCH 26: Max Verstappen of the Netherlands driving the (33) Red Bull Racing Red Bull-TAG Heuer RB13 TAG Heuer battles for position with Kimi Raikkonen of Finland driving the (7) Scuderia Ferrari SF70H on track during the Australian Formula One Grand Prix at Albert Park on March 26, 2017 in Melbourne, Australia. (Photo by Mark Thompson/Getty Images)

Following a massive global fan survey, Formula One’s Grand Prix Drivers’ Association Chairman Alex Wurz has come forward to alleviate any worries that fans might have regarding the future of the global Motorsport, claiming that they are listening carefully, as well as taking some time to address a common misconception regarding the notion that the cars are “too easy” to drive.

“Some comments about the cars being too easy to drive were misunderstood as some guys wanting a manual gear stick and no power steering, or we go to the stone age of car engineering.

This is the point where the drivers came and said: ‘Gentleman, it is never easy to win against the best in the world, not even in a wheelbarrow. But these cars are not physically demanding and from the sensation they are not exciting for us’. That is what we meant.

If a newcomer on his third lap ever in an F1 car is told to go slower because he exceeds tire energy limits, that wasn’t what was authentic and cool.

And they [F1’s chiefs] have understood and they have worked together, and so the direction is completely fine and good. But we are not there yet to what the sport can be.” – Alex Wurz

Sebastian Vettel (GER) Ferrari SF70H. 26.03.2017. Formula 1 World Championship, Rd 1, Australian Grand Prix, Albert Park, Melbourne, Australia, Race Day. - www.xpbimages.com, EMail: requests@xpbimages.com - copy of publication required for printed pictures. Every used picture is fee-liable. © Copyright: Batchelor / XPB Images

Wurz’ comments illustrate a point that is worth paying attention to: the future of the sport is the fans. Without their support, approval, and continued viewership, the wells of money would dry up and the track would lie barren.

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