Idle Games Are Forcing Players To Wait Rather Than Game

Tristan Teitler

Once upon a time, in a land not so very far away people played video games and experienced fun and pride as they explored new worlds.

Players conquered challenging enemies using their wits and cunning, solved interesting puzzles that proved their intelligence and wisdom, and genuinely felt a sense of accomplishment after beating a game.

Modern Games

What about modern games? Some games such as Skyrim, The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wilds, and the Dark Souls series have done a fantastic job of using modern technological and graphical advancements to enhance the fun-having, pride-building adventures games offer players. However, not all modern games are so great.

In fact, many newer games are filled with an activity that prevents players from playing: waiting. Aron Hanson (A.K.A. Egoraptor), popular animator, actor, and let’s player, made note of the paradoxical nature of including excessive waiting in games. In his most recent Sequelitis episode, Hanson compared The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time to the original The Legend of Zelda stating:

“…a lot of the charm from the original Zelda was how ruthless the game was, and a complex fighting system would be a perfect place to implement that. But! The source of a lot of Ocarina’s problems is that the game’s idea of difficulty is waiting. There’s so much goddamn waiting… in Ocarina.

“Every enemy has a period where they just stand around and do fucking nothing, and attacking them during this time is useless. Deku Scrubs, Stalfos, Lizardmen, Skulltula, Wolf dudes, Gerudos, Clams? Waiting is not a difficult thing to do. But it creates the illusion of difficulty, because it takes up your time. And that’s all it does.”

Idle Games

The worst perpetrators of making players wait aren’t on consoles, though; they love on your computers and on your phones.

Idle games have been extremely popular as they allow individuals to still progress while not having to pay any significant attention to the game. The game even continues to play on its own after the application is closed! While this may mean people can advance while at work, school, or anywhere else, it defeats the purpose of playing a game – that’s because players aren’t playing, they’re waiting.

How far you get in an idle game doesn’t prove your dedication or skills, it proves how long ago you downloaded the game. A lot of the time these idle games don’t have an ending, so player can’t even get the satisfaction of beating the game, instead they often have to restart the game in return for receiving a small passive boost.

So, if you’re really looking to play a game, not wait for a game, don’t download anything with the word “idle.” You’d be better off watching paint dry, at least that doesn’t offer micro-transactions.

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