TaylorMade breakaway from 130 years of club design

TaylorMade’s new Twist Face delivers straight distance thanks to the most advanced face technology in the brand’s history.

Driver faces have followed the same bulge and role design principles since the concept was first introduced in 1888. That’s right, 130 years ago. Of course the design and construction of drivers has changed immeasurably since the late 1800s, but the key principle has remained the same.

2018 M3 Driver Face
So what does bulge and roll actually mean? Well, basically it is designed to help your mishits go a little straighter. The curvature of the clubface means that if you strike the ball out of the toe with left sidespin, the bulge causes the ball to start more out towards the right and hook less, and the opposite is true of shots struck in the heel. It is a solution that has worked for golf club manufactures for over a century, but TaylorMade are turning this convention on its head with the creation of its new Face Twist technology.

2018 M3 Driver 3Quarter
This new tech is truly the first of its kind. Twist Face, featured in both the new M3 & M4 drivers, is TaylorMade’s solution to counteract golfers’ most common misses, more specifically, those resulting from the high toe and low heel impacts.

TaylorMade studied data captured from more than half a million shots that simultaneously tracks head presentation (in-out path, angle of attack, loft, impact location), initial launch conditions and final landing location of the golf ball, TaylorMade engineers discovered there was a flaw in the traditional bulge and roll. In fact, high face shots and high toe shots have a left tendency of the target line and spin significantly less. Similarly, low face and low heel shots tend to land right of the target line with a significantly more spin.

2018 M3 Driver Address
To counteract the high-toe miss (a hook), the driver face has been ‘twisted’ open (loft increased & face opened) on the high-toe to help straighten ball flight. Similarly, to counteract the low-heel miss (a slice) the driver face has been twisted closed to de-loft and close the face in the low heel area.

“From the creation of the first metalwood in 1979, TaylorMade has established a legacy of breaking from tradition to reach new thresholds of performance. In 2018, we have once again uncovered a new frontier of driving potential with Twist Face Technology,” said Brian Bazzel, Vice President, Product Creation.

– Brian Bazzel, Vice President, Product Creation

He continued, “This radical departure from traditional driver-face design is engineered to correct for inherent human swing tendencies in real-time, giving golfers a tangible competitive advantage.”

Is TaylorMade’s latest innovation another example of the cyclical sensationalism, or have they legitimately conceived a club design that will transform the ball striking of even the most inconsistent hacker.

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